Chocolate Dipped Bacon Wrapped Bananas

chocolate-dipped-bacon-wrapped-bananas

Chocolate-Dipped, Bacon-Wrapped Bananas

If you think that bacon and bananas don’t go together, we’re here to tell you that you are wrong! If you’ve never tried this delectable flavor combo, you don’t know what you’re missing. This impressive dessert-on-a-stick is easy to make and will spark some interesting debate and conversation at your next party.

This recipe comes to us from Story by ModCloth, a smartly-crafted blog filled with the best and brightest of fashion and culture. It’s your place for all things ModCloth. Focused on community-driven content and the art of storytelling, they are always on the hunt for their next feature.

chocolate dipped bacon wrapped bananas

2 large bananas
4 strips thick-sliced bacon, cut in half
4 tablespoons brown sugar
2 tablespoons Cajun seasoning
2 tablespoons vegetable oil for frying
1 10-oz. package chocolate chips
8 toothpicks
8 bamboo sticks
Wax or parchment paper

1. Quarter bananas into pieces the width of the bacon. Wrap bacon around banana pieces and secure with toothpick.

2. Mix brown sugar and Cajun seasoning on plate to create rub. Set aside.

3. Heat oil in frying pan on medium/high heat, then add bacon-wrapped bananas. Fry evenly on each side until bacon is 3/4 of the way cooked.

4. Remove bacon-wrapped bananas from oil. Coat completely with sugar rub, remove toothpicks, then fry again until sugar caramelizes. Remove each, then either serve as is, or continue on to steps 5-8.

5. Place in freezer to cool for 30 minutes.

6. While you wait, melt chocolate chips in double boiler, stirring consistently as needed.

7. Remove bacon-wrapped bananas from freezer, then secure each to bamboo sticks for dipping.

8. Roll pieces in chocolate until covered, then set on wax or parchment paper. Refrigerate immediately until chocolate hardens.

chocolate dipped bacon wrapped bananas

chocolate dipped bacon wrapped bananas

The post Chocolate Dipped Bacon Wrapped Bananas appeared first on Bacon Today.

Koji Rye Rugbrød

As much as I loathe to admit it, I am a creature of habit. Over the past 18 months, a big part of my weekend routine is working a dough throughout Saturday then waking up removing the loaf from the fridge where the loaf finished the second rise, then going for a run and finally returning to bake the bread. The inspiration for most of the loaves and all of the technique have been Chad Robertson’s Tartine books. His first bread book, and even more specifically the first chapter of that book, providing weeks of tinkering – trying to figure out what worked for me.

His second book outlined more variety from whole, ancient, and sprouted grains. I have been tinkering with many of the different loaves by alternating styles on a weekly basis, but the loaves I eat, the Danish Rugbrød-style loaves, have opened me up to different styles of baking. These loaves also have pushed me to develop a list of what I like and do not like in these loaves. Typically, I love the texture of the seeded, dense loaves, but with repetition, this week, I preferred something softer, but still complex.

After making a boule of a koji-wheat bread made with koji porridge, I knew the koji porridge was something special. The porridge was sweet, but unlike most things sweet, it was multidimensional. The combination of the multidimensional sweetness from the koji was particularly great with the softness likely originating with the high hydration from the porridge. The flavors of the bread was one of my favorites of any of the breads I have baked. With that great flavor I though back to Rugbrød, but I  wanted to add a little of the softness more typical in porridge breads.

To keep the koji theme, I used, as Robertson features in some of his loaves prepared amazake, a sweet fermented koji pudding. Basically, this bread is double koji and to keep up the theme of doubles, I used rye bran as well as rye flour, along with spelt flour to bake the bread. I kept the typical additions to the loaf-style breads of flax seeds, sunflower seeds, sesame seeds and pumpkin seeds, so I started with the koji porridge.

To make the porridge, I pulse koji a few times in a spice grinder or food processor to break up the kernels and then add four times the volume of koji in water. The koji simmers on the stovetop until it turns into sweet moldy rice sludge. Then let the porridge cool. Once it has cooled, the sourdough starter was mixed with water, beer, butter milk and amazake. Then, the spelt flour, rye flour and rye bran was stirred in (ratio of 4:1:1).

After nearly a half hour, koji porridge was added at an equal ratio to the flour/bran. That is the trick here. Whether it is sprouted rye berries or koji porridge, these breads are dense with whole or broken or sprouted grains. Finally the bread is seasoned and loaded with flax, sunflower, pumkin and sesame seeds (about 80% by weight of the koji porridge – yes, more roughage). The bread is worked over a day by making folds every half hour and then resting in a buttered loaf pan overnight.

The next morning, the bread bakes in an oven a little cooler than an oven would be for a typical loaf. Even with the limited flour, the loaf still has a little rise to it. After finishing the bake, the loaf rests on a rack for at least eight hours. By that point the smell of freshly baked serious bread has been in my face all day. The first slice reveals a crackly crust and a richly textured but soft interior. The koji has a complex sweetness after baking in much the same way as it did in porridge form, but has more of a roasted flavor than a toasted flavor. The seeds bring a richness that is magnified by the soft texture of the crumb.

This is a really interesting loaf which has qualities of both a Rugbrød, but also a softer loaf. Despite enjoying baking as a routine, it is fun to break off course a little to try something fresh and new. It is exciting to experiment a little with in the routine.


Bringin’ Up A Bacon Baby – Breakfast with Daddy!

Coming up on Lil’s 3rd birthday, so I’m starting to be comfortable with her having a little bacon, but I’m afraid bacon may already have her in it’s clutches…

A few weeks ago, we were at breakfast with friends and Lil’ reaches over and just takes the bacon of my plate and starts chewing…what?!?  You take MY bacon?

Then we have family over for breakfast last week and there go her little hands into the serving plate and up with slices.

And now today…we’ll she’s wavin’ it all around, gnawin’ on it like some type of animal…

That’s my girl!  ;-)

Originally posted 2011-09-10 21:44:45.

Related Stories:October 2, 2010 Bringin’ Up a Bacon Baby…How Do You Spell Pig?January 25, 2010 Bringin’ Up a Bacon Baby…Teachum’ Young

Cost of bacon rising

My google reader alerted me that bacon will be more expensive this summer. Which is interesting, because I've always been somewhat alarmed by the fact that it's cheaper than anything else. Seriously, a lot of Chinese restaurants in Chicago charge $1-2 less for the pork dishes than even the vegetable ones. According to the article, a major factor is the rising price of corn (can we PLEASE quit with the ethanol subsidies people? This is ridiculous.), but I kind of wonder if general trendiness isn't playing a role as well.

Better with Bacon – Bacon Pancakes

This weekend, while in Chicago, my group decided to have breakfast at the Original Pancake House.  Boy howdy!!!  That was some fine eatin’ (which I will post about as soon as I have the photographic evidence I need to visually confirm how YUMMY it was).

One of their menu items was Bacon Pancakes…

So in that spirit, I present to you this week, THIS recipe for your own hotcakes with sweet pork meat!

recipe and photo via merrimentdesign.com

recipe and photo via merrimentdesign.com

Bacon Pancakes

Ingredients:

Bacon Pancake mix Real maple syrup Pam for Grilling Orange slices (optional)

Directions:

First, cook your bacon. Try to cook the bacon as flat as you can  – later it will keep the pancake batter from oozing under the bacon and hiding it. Drain on paper towels and set aside. Heat your griddle so it’s warming up. Mix your pancake batter as directed, but make it on the thinner side by adding more liquid. Transfer your batter into a Pyrex pouring cup so it’s easier to work. Drip water on your griddle to see if it’s hot. If they bubble, you’re ready. Spray your hot griddle with Pam for Grilling. Break your cooked bacon into 1/2 inch pieces or so and place tightly together in a circle. Pour your pancake batter in a circle, starting outside in, and covering all the bacon pieces. Cook until lightly browned and bubbling on the edges, a couple of minutes or so, and flip. Garnish with orange and enjoy with real maple syrup. Salty and sweet. Yum.

recipe via merrimentdesign.com – click link to view the author’s step-by-step photos.

Originally posted 2009-06-02 11:11:02.

Related Stories:September 22, 2013 Better with Bacon – Beer and Bacon Mancakes…July 16, 2013 Better with Bacon – Bourbon Bacon Pancakes…

Better with Bacon – Bacon Pancakes

This weekend, while in Chicago, my group decided to have breakfast at the Original Pancake House.  Boy howdy!!!  That was some fine eatin’ (which I will post about as soon as I have the photographic evidence I need to visually confirm how YUMMY it was).

One of their menu items was Bacon Pancakes…

So in that spirit, I present to you this week, THIS recipe for your own hotcakes with sweet pork meat!

recipe and photo via merrimentdesign.com

recipe and photo via merrimentdesign.com

Bacon Pancakes

Ingredients:

Bacon Pancake mix Real maple syrup Pam for Grilling Orange slices (optional)

Directions:

First, cook your bacon. Try to cook the bacon as flat as you can  – later it will keep the pancake batter from oozing under the bacon and hiding it. Drain on paper towels and set aside. Heat your griddle so it’s warming up. Mix your pancake batter as directed, but make it on the thinner side by adding more liquid. Transfer your batter into a Pyrex pouring cup so it’s easier to work. Drip water on your griddle to see if it’s hot. If they bubble, you’re ready. Spray your hot griddle with Pam for Grilling. Break your cooked bacon into 1/2 inch pieces or so and place tightly together in a circle. Pour your pancake batter in a circle, starting outside in, and covering all the bacon pieces. Cook until lightly browned and bubbling on the edges, a couple of minutes or so, and flip. Garnish with orange and enjoy with real maple syrup. Salty and sweet. Yum.

recipe via merrimentdesign.com – click link to view the author’s step-by-step photos.

Originally posted 2009-06-02 11:11:02.

Related Stories:September 22, 2013 Better with Bacon – Beer and Bacon Mancakes…July 16, 2013 Better with Bacon – Bourbon Bacon Pancakes…

2892. BACON, AVOCADO and STRAWBERRY SALAD with GREEK YOGURT POPPY SEED DRESSING

yields 4-6 servings?

3 cups baby spinach3 cups torn romaine lettuce or other crisp greens10 slices bacon, crisp cooked and crumbled2 cups ripe strawberries, washed and quartered2 ripe avocados, sliced1/4 cup sliced almonds
For the Greek Yogurt Poppyseed Dressing:1/4 cup Greek yogurt1/4 cup mayonnaise2 tablespoons white vinegar1 tablespoon sugar1 teaspoon poppy seedssalt and pepper to taste
To a salad bowl, add the spinach and lettuce and toss to combine. Top with quartered strawberries, sliced avocado, almonds, and crumbled bacon.?
In a smaller bowl, whisk together the yogurt, mayo, vinegar, sugar, poppy seeds, salt and pepper until smooth. Drizzle over salad and serve promptly (or if not serving promptly, leave dressing on the side so as to not wilt the lettuce).

bacon recipe courtesy of: Alaska from Scratch, March 11, 2013

Gyro Pita BLT

gyro-pita-blt-recipe2 Here at Bacon Today, we’re big fans of the gyro sandwich. A great gyro is piled high with succulent lamb, beef or chicken on hearty pita bread. Our motto when it comes to gyros is, “the more meat, the better.” Add some tangy tzatziki sauce and you’re in gyro heaven. And of course as we are also big bacon fans, we decided to create a gyro with bacon instead of the traditional meat fillings. We coated meaty bacon slices with Greek seasonings and baked them to perfection. Then we stuffed them in pita bread and slathered on the tzatziki  to create this “Gyro BLT.” Enjoy, bacon fans!

gyro-pit-blt2gyro-seasoned-bacon

Ingredients

3 Gyro seasoned bacon strips, cooked, cut in half
1 Pita rounds
Red onion, to taste, thinly sliced,
Tomato, to taste, sliced
Lettuce, to taste, shredded
Tzatziki (make the day before)

Tzatziki Sauce:
16 ounces plain yogurt
1 medium cucumber, peeled, seeded, and finely chopped
Pinch kosher salt
4 cloves garlic, finely minced
1 tablespoon olive oil
2 teaspoons red wine vinegar
1 Tablespoon chopped fresh dill

Tzatziki Sauce:
Place the yogurt in a tea towel or cheese cloth. Set over a bowl; cover and refrigerate for 2 hours or overnight.

Later, place the chopped cucumber in a tea towel, and squeeze to remove as much liquid as possible. Discard the liquid and add to the drained yogurt.

Mash the garlic cloves into a paste and combine with the salt, dill, olive oil, and vinegar. Refrigerate for at least an hour to let the flavors meld together. Store in the refrigerator in an airtight container for no more than one week.

The BLT:
Spread a heaping dollop of Tzatziki Sauce onto a pita, followed by a small handful of lettuce. Top with bacon strips, tomato, and onions. Serve with a side of tzatziki and rice pilaf, greek salad, or french fires.
gyro-pit-blt gyro-pit-blt3

The post Gyro Pita BLT appeared first on Bacon Today.

Know Your Bacon – Lesson 1

Some basic “classifications” of bacon that you should know:

Canadian bacon: Oval-shaped cut from pork loin; looks like ham; lean, cured, lightly smoked; called “back bacon” in Canada.

Country-style bacon: Can refer to any thick-sliced bacon; can also be salty, cured, heavily smoked bacon from the same hogs as country hams.

Jowl bacon: Typically a Southern variety cut from pork cheek; cured and smoked like regular bacon, but contains more fat.

Pancetta: Dry-cured pork belly, typically not smoked; often from Italy, but also made in the U.S.; usually rolled and sliced quite thin.

Streaky bacon: British term for typical American supermarket bacon.

Salt pork: Mostly fat, with a little lean, from cured pork belly; not smoked; sometimes called “streak o’ lean;” used mostly for flavoring.

Source: “The Bacon Cookbook” by James Villas (Wiley, $35)

Originally posted 2009-03-07 07:30:44.

Related Stories:March 31, 2011 Dinner with the Family at CPK…April 15, 2013 Makin’ Bacon – For Realz!

Better with Bacon – Easy Bacon Pie

Those that know me know that I do not dig on eggs…but this blog’s not all about me…it’s about sharing me and all things bacon with the interwebs!

I will never make this nor eat it if someone made it for me, but you’all who like eggs can appreciate this quick and easy recipe and then tell me if it’s good or not.

baconpie

photo via Right Cuisine

Recipe after the jump…Easy Bacon Pie

Ingredients:

10 slices bacon, cooked and crumbled 1 cup grated cheese 1/3 cup chopped onion 2 cups milk 1 cup Bisquick 4 eggs 1/4 tsp salt 1/8 tsp pepper

Directions:

Heat oven to 400 degrees. Lightly grease a 10 inch pie plate. Sprinkle bacon, cheese and onion on pie plate. Beat remaining ingredients until smooth. Pour into pie plate. Bake 30 min or until golden brown and knife inserted in center comes out clean. Let stand 5 min.

If using 9 inch pie plate, decrease milk to 1 1/2 cups, Bisquick to 3/4 cup, and eggs to three.

Recipe by Cathryn Friar through Right Cuisine.

Originally posted 2009-05-27 12:00:00.

Related Stories:March 27, 2014 Better with Bacon – Bacon Wrapped Eggs…February 28, 2014 A Breakfast We Can Believe In…