International Bacon Day!

Shame on us! We could give a lot of excuses as to why we have been so remiss in this year's preparation for IBD. (This Saturday the 5th) But really, there is no excuse, its bacon's big day! We could blame work and home life and the fact that Darren is a quitter. But no! We are bad and should be punished (as long as said punishment is not a withholding of bacon, that's just cruel, whats the number for Amnesty International?).

That being said, I do intend to have a small celebration, 3 meals, all with bacon, and maybe some snacking bacon in between. I wonder if this kid will be celebrating?

Better with Bacon – Bacon & Bourbon Pie Crust…

Happy Thanksgiving to all of my 10′s of readers!  Much like Halloween week, I’m going to try to “theme” this week in recognition of that one day of year where we are encouraged to give thanks for all we have while eating ourselves into a coma.

Let’s begin with this tasty looking recipe…and just like last week it brings two of my favorites together!  From last week’s “LA Times”

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photo Kirk McKoy / Los Angeles Times

Bacon & Bourbon Pie Crust

Ingredients:

1 1/2 cups (6.4 ounces) flour 1/2 teaspoon salt 2 teaspoons sugar 3 tablespoons cold bacon grease or shortening, cut into 3 pieces 5 tablespoons cold butter, cut into 1/2 -inch cubes 2 tablespoons cold bourbon 2 tablespoons ice water, more as needed

Directions:

To make the dough using a food processor, pulse together the flour, salt and sugar until thoroughly combined. Add the bacon grease and pulse until incorporated (the dough will look like moist sand). Add the butter and pulse just until the butter is reduced to small, pea-sized pieces. Sprinkle the bourbon and water over the mixture, and pulse once or twice until incorporated. Remove the crumbly mixture to a large bowl and gently press the mixture together with a large spoon, rubber spatula or the palm of your hand just until it comes together to form a dough. Mold the dough into a disc roughly 6 inches in diameter. Cover the disc tightly with plastic wrap and refrigerate at least 2 hours, preferably overnight. To make the dough by hand, whisk together the flour, salt and sugar in a large bowl. Add the bacon grease and incorporate using a pastry cutter or fork (the dough will look like moist sand). Cut in the butter just until it is reduced to small, pea-sized pieces. Sprinkle the bourbon and water over the mixture, and stir together just until incorporated. Gently press the crumbly mixture together with a large spoon, rubber spatula or the palm of your hand just until it comes together to form a dough. Mold the dough into a disc roughly 6 inches in diameter. Cover the disc tightly with plastic wrap and refrigerate at least 2 hours, preferably overnight. On a lightly floured surface, roll the dough out into a round roughly 13 inches in diameter. Place in a 9-inch baking dish, crimping the edges as desired. Freeze the formed shell for 20 to 30 minutes before filling and baking.

Total time: 20 minutes, plus chilling and freezing times for the dough and shell

Servings: Makes crust for 1 (9-inch) standard pie shell

Note: Refrigerate the dough at least 2 hours, preferably overnight, to give the dough sufficient time to relax; otherwise, it may toughen and shrink while baking. If using shortening instead of the bacon grease, increase the salt by 1/4 teaspoon (to 3/4 teaspoon). For a nice sheen, brush the crust with egg white before baking.

via LATimes.com

Originally posted 2009-11-23 11:00:02.

Related Stories:April 18, 2013 Better with Bacon – Bourbon Bacon Pecan PieFebruary 14, 2014 Better with Bacon – Bacon Bourbon Brownies…

Hot Bacon Beverages

As much as it pains me to say it, the time of iced coffees and cold everything is sadly over. There’s something about a latte when its on ice that makes me forget I’m drinking enough caffeine to make my heart feel like it’s going to explode, which somehow makes me feel less guilty. That [...]

You had me at Bacon Wrapped!

This post is written by Ashley Bayles.

I guess I never realized how much I talk about bacon, as the trend of bacon themed photos tagging me on Facebook and bacon themed gifts just keeps happening. I am going to give up trying to escape my reputation as a bacon lover and just embrace it. Meat is not even something that I can eat a ton of at once since I find it fills me up very quickly. I tried to become a vegetarian once when I was in high school, but I worked in the mall and two of my favorite items were the New York Fries “The Works” which was mostly delicious because of the bacon bits on it, and the Teen Burger at A&W, because of the bacon. I lasted about a week before A&W and New York Fries won the battle. I think they had an unfair bacon advantage!

Another thing I love is guacamole, so you can image my pleasure when I was living in Colombia to discover an amazing hamburger place called El Corral, that had a Mexican Burger! It is a burger with guacamole, and refried beans! Is it such a delicious beast and the meat they use is so good it is the best burger I have ever had in my life. If you ever go to Colombia you must try Corral’s Hamburgesa Mexicana! The only thing it is missing is bacon.

I have decided that the combination of guacamole and bacon needs to be explored. Someone seems to have read my mind and answered my prayers. My friend Melanie was just in Mexico over Christmas and came across something that made her think of me. I am not quite sure how she knew of my love for bacon, but this photo was one of the best shots I have seen in a long time.

Maybe Japadog needs some competition in the way of a Mexidog stand?

Everything is better when it is wrapped in bacon. The only scallops or water chestnuts I eat are wrapped in bacon. I love sirloin more when it is bacon wrapped. Next on my list: hot dogs!

A History of Bacon Advertising

history-of-bacon-advertising

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The season premiere of Mad Men is on April 13th. It’s also the last season premiere, a fact that makes many Bacon Today staff very, very sad. Many things have contributed to the success of the show, like its excellent writing and Don Draper’s smoking-hot looks. We’ve put together a bacon advertising post as homage to the show that has revitalized interest in the history of advertising.

If there’s one thing that vintage bacon ads tell us, it’s that not much has really changed regarding America’s favorite meat candy. Bacon is shown as a campfire favorite, a hangover helper, the duct tape of food, and as something that can be added to just about any other food to make it better. So mix yourself an Old Fashioned and take a nostalgia trip by checking out these retro bacon ads.

Bacon = Hangover Cure

This ad from 1920 advised consumers to “Start the New Year right.” In other words, lose the New Year’s Day hangover with a bacon sandwich.

new year's bacon

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Bacon & camping

Long before REI, bacon was the meat of choice for cookin’ up around the campfire. Luckily this hasn’t changed, but thankfully camping clothes have. Can you even imagine setting up camp in a dress and heels??

bacon camping

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Wrap it in bacon!

Bacon-wrapped meatloaf and bacon-wrapped hot dogs. Still delicious and still popular. This first one looks like a Bacon Explosion forerunner.

early bacon explosion olive stuffed

oscar mayer bacon-wrapped hot dogs

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Not so sure about these bacon-wrapped sweet potatoes on pineapple slices, though… Perhaps in 1928, this was considered haute cuisine.

1928 swift pineapple potato

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If anyone can tell us what is in this 1946 ad, please do so!

1946 bacon wraped around what_

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Make it better with bacon!

Bacon’s appeal was used to sell other foods and make foods that are unappealing to some people more edible. Like, canned sauerkraut. Check out these Bacon-Wrapped Kraut Kabobs. Eww…

libbyssauerkraut

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Bacon: it’s what’s for breakfast.

Serving bacon with French toast and pancakes is just as popular as it ever was. Check out these sweet “Bacon Logs” that are made by stacking pieces of French toast and bacon strips, and the classic short stack served with bacon.

bacon logs

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makin bacon pancakes!

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rath bacon

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Bacon is good protein.

The debate on whether bacon is healthy will go on and on, but few can debate the fact that the protein and fat in bacon will keep a person full for hours. “Bacon is the savory, flavory way to spark the brighter breakfasts that nutritionists tell us active minds and bodies need.” And yet, the bagels vs. bacon debate still goes on.

fill up the skillet secretary ad

Is that you, Peggy Olson?

?

Who stole the bacon?

Bacon theft was a common theme in bacon advertising. Kids stole it, and blamed it on the dog. Dads stole it, and blamed it on the kids. And bacon theft still happens to this very day.

dad stealing bacon

blame it on the dog 1959

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Bacon & Patriotism

1940’s bacon advertising couldn’t help but reference WWII. This ad mentions the advances made in packaging that allowed soldiers to receive canned bacon.

better 1945 bacon war ad

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This 1946 ad from Swift’s refers to food rationing and mentions “dark days and bright” and “in peace and in war.” With food rationing going on, consumers wanted to be assured that there was equal access to bacon.

1946 bacon and brocolli_

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Smoky Bacon!

The smoky taste of bacon is why we love it so. The smoke from the campfire indicates “that heavenly sweet smoke taste.”

1952 campfire sorta

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How it’s smoked.

“It’s Ovenized!” was Swift’s marketing slogan that let customers know about their improved smoking techniques.

ovenizing bacon

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How it’s packaged.

New-fangled inventions like cellophane allowed customers to see what they were getting.

bacon camping ad-edit

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It’s hard to wait for bacon.

Not much has changed since 1955. No one likes waiting for da bacon!

1955 wilson bacon

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Toaster Bacon?

One thing that hasn’t endured (thank god!): toaster bacon. ‘Nuff said.

reddi-bacon

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Bacon for Holiday Meals

This ad for “Rose Brand” bacon recommends eating the classic “bacon and eggs” breakfast on Easter Sunday.

easter breakfast bacon rose brand

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Bacon Cherubs

Image heavy and light on copy, this early bacon ad features a cherubic child and the simple motto, “Worth hunting for.”

swift bacon with girl in hat

The post A History of Bacon Advertising appeared first on Bacon Today.

Venison Summer Sausage

In round two of turning venison scrap from my father into something more edible, I made a dangerous choice – a sausage of great familiarity. Summer Sausage. It is easy to cook without context when the only question is “Does it taste good?” I guess easy is relative, because it seems easy in comparison to when you are cooking something familiar and add “Does it taste right?” to “Does it taste good?” Venison summer sausage is, when combined with Ritz crackers and cheese, the most popular pre-dinner, post-lunch food in Wisconsin. When given venison scrap, how could i have ignored the opportunity to stock the pre-dinner, post-lunch larder for the year, or more likely, the remainder of April?

I based the recipe on an earlier beef summer sausage I made. I also opted to keep the grind very coarse. This is somewhat in conflict with standard summer sausage, but I like the texture of the sausage better with a coarse grind despite liking the appearance better with the finer grind.

A finer grind gives the even and consistent red/white speckled sausage. The coarse grind gives a more irregular pattern, but keeps a more significant chew in the texture.

At every turn, I tried to keep the sausage traditional. Down to the fibrous casings. I typically prefer natural casings, but traditionally those casings are shunned for the synthetic casings.

With a short period for fermentation, there is a pleasant souring of the summer sausage. Once the casings have been soaked, stuffed, and set out to ferment, they dry overnight and then spend a little time over smoke. To maximize smoke time, I started the sausages over cold smoke. Cold smoking is not necessary, but if you take care to keep temps low in the beginning, the amount of smoke the sausages get before their temps reach 150 degrees is much higher.

After the sausages were dropped into a sink of ice and water to stop the cooking process, I chilled them. The next day, I sliced up the smaller sausage (the sausage I am keeping as a fabrication tax). The first thing I noticed was the texture was as I had hoped. There was no mushiness which can happen in the finely ground Wisconsin venison summer sausage.

The meaty and moderately gamey venison flavors were the most prevalent flavor with sweet smokiness. I smoked the sausages over chestnut hulls and corn cobs (mostly because I was cleaning out the freezer and they were there). The smoke coming from the corn cobs smelled amazing and I will save my summer cobs to smoke next fall. As I have noted in the past, I appreciate the gamier flavors of wild venison and really wanted to let those flavors come through.

The spices added subtle flavors, but these sausages were decidedly simple and I was happy for it. The contextless venison boudin from last week came with no measuring stick. A venison summer sausage comes with expectations and this sausage meets those and it is a relief more than anything.

Venison Summer Sausage 36 ounces venison, ground with large die 12 ounces pork back fat, ground with large die 1/4 cup ramp kraut juice 23 grams kosher salt 30 grams nonfat dry milk powder 20 grams dextrose 1/2 tsp ground ginger 2 cloves garlic, grated 1 tablespoon chili flake 4 grams pink salt 3 grams black pepper, crushed 3 grams coriander seed, crushed 1 grams fennel seed, crushed 6 grams mustard seed, crushed

Step one: Combine all of the ingredients above in a cold mixing bowl and stir with a paddle attachment until a meatball-sized piece of meat sticks to your hand as it is suspended.

Step two: Stuff into fibrous casings which have been soaked in hot tap water for 30 minutes. Tie tightly and prick casings to remove air bubbles.

Step three: Hang in a warm room for 10-12 hours to ferment. Then store in the fridge until you smoke the sausages.

Step four: Start the sausage with cold smoke (as cold as possible) for 2 hours. Then increase heat until sausages reach 150 degrees internal temps. Shock in an ice bath.

Step five: Store in the fridge. Consume with cheese, crackers, and beer.


Venison Summer Sausage

In round two of turning venison scrap into something more edible, I made a dangerous choice. A sausage of great familiarity. Summer Sausage. It is easy to be without context when the only question is “Does it taste good?” I guess easy is relative, because it seems easy in comparison to when you are familiar and add “Does it taste right?” to “Does it taste good?” Venison summer sausage is, when combined with Ritz crackers and cheese, the most popular pre-dinner, post-lunch food in Wisconsin. When given venison scrap, how could i have ignored the opportunity to stock the pre-dinner, post-lunch larder for the year, or more likely, the remainder of April?

I based the recipe on an earlier beef summer sausage I made. I also opted to keep the grind very coarse. This is somewhat in conflict with standard summer sausage, but I like the texture of the sausage better with a coarse grind despite liking the appearance better with the finer grind.

A finer grind gives the even and consistent red/white speckled sausage. The coarse grind gives a more irregular pattern, but keeps a more significant chew in the texture.

With a short period for fermentation, there is a pleasant souring of the summer sausage. At every turn, I tried to keep the sausage traditional. Down to the fibrous casings. I typically prefer natural casings, but traditionally those casings are shunned for the synthetic casings.

Once the casings have been soaked, stuffed, and set out to ferment, they dry overnight and then spend a little time over smoke. To maximize smoke time, I started the sausages over cold smoke. This is not necessary, but if you take care to keep temps low in the beginning, the amount of smoke the sausages get before their temps reach 150 degrees is much higher.

After the sausages, were dropped into a sink of ice and water, I chilled them. The next day, I sliced up the smaller sausage. The first thing I noticed was the texture was as I had hoped. There was no mushiness which can happen in the Wisconsin venison summer sausage. The flavors were strongly venison with sweet smokiness. I smoked the sausages over chestnut hulls and corn cobs (mostly because I was cleaning out the freezer and they were there). The smoke coming from the corn cobs smelled amazing and I will save my summer cobs to smoke next fall.

The spices added subtle flavors, but these sausages were decidedly simple and I was happy for it. The contextless venison boudin from last week came with no measuring stick. A venison summer sausage comes with expectations and this sausage meets those and it is a relief more than anything.

Venison Summer Sausage 36 ounces venison, ground with large die 12 ounces pork back fat, ground with large die 1/4 cup ramp kraut juice 23 grams kosher salt 30 grams nonfat dry milk powder 20 grams dextrose 1/2 tsp ground ginger 2 cloves garlic, grated 1 tablespoon chili flake 4 grams pink salt 3 grams black pepper, crushed 3 grams coriander seed, crushed 1 grams fennel seed, crushed 6 grams mustard seed, crushed

Step one: Combine all of the ingredients above in a cold mixing bowl and stir with a paddle attachment until a meatball-sized piece of meat sticks to your hand as it is suspended.

Step two: Stuff into fibrous casings which have been soaked in hot tap water for 30 minutes. Tie tightly and prick casings to remove air bubbles.

Step three: Hang in a warm room for 10-12 hours to ferment. Then store in the fridge until you smoke the sausages.

Step four: Start the sausage with cold smoke (as cold as possible) for 2 hours. Then increase heat until sausages reach 150 degrees internal temps. Shock in an ice bath.

Step five: Store in the fridge. Consume with cheese, crackers, and beer.


Bacon Pic of the Day – Saving the Auto Industry…

It’s technological innovation like this that will help bring our domestic auto companies out of recession!

I want to see this at the 2011 North American International Auto Show!  Do you hear me Big Three???  Get on it!

Originally posted 2010-05-20 10:02:24.

Related Stories:November 23, 2013 Bacon Pic of the Day – I Ate What?February 22, 2014 Bacon Pic of the Day – Where Does Bacon Come From?

International Bacon Day!

Shame on us! We could give a lot of excuses as to why we have been so remiss in this year's preparation for IBD. (This Saturday the 5th) But really, there is no excuse, its bacon's big day! We could blame work and home life and the fact that Darren is a quitter. But no! We are bad and should be punished (as long as said punishment is not a withholding of bacon, that's just cruel, whats the number for Amnesty International?).

That being said, I do intend to have a small celebration, 3 meals, all with bacon, and maybe some snacking bacon in between. I wonder if this kid will be celebrating?

Bacon Boutique – Elemental Bacon…

Along the same lines as this shirt comes this nice looking tee from the folks at Tanga

You better act quick, this could sell out at any time especially since it’s 1) cool and B) just $7.99 (not including S&H).  Want it?  CLICK HERE.

Thanks to FoTDB Seth (SHOUT OUT!) who bought this to my attention this morning and to his friend Amy (SHOUT OUT) for telling him to go and buy it!

Originally posted 2010-05-14 09:13:27.

Related Stories:October 15, 2009 Bacon Boutique – Makin’ Bacon!August 31, 2013 Bacon Boutique – Lifestyle Choice…