Venison Summer Sausage

In round two of turning venison scrap from my father into something more edible, I made a dangerous choice – a sausage of great familiarity. Summer Sausage. It is easy to cook without context when the only question is “Does it taste good?” I guess easy is relative, because it seems easy in comparison to when you are cooking something familiar and add “Does it taste right?” to “Does it taste good?” Venison summer sausage is, when combined with Ritz crackers and cheese, the most popular pre-dinner, post-lunch food in Wisconsin. When given venison scrap, how could i have ignored the opportunity to stock the pre-dinner, post-lunch larder for the year, or more likely, the remainder of April?

I based the recipe on an earlier beef summer sausage I made. I also opted to keep the grind very coarse. This is somewhat in conflict with standard summer sausage, but I like the texture of the sausage better with a coarse grind despite liking the appearance better with the finer grind.

A finer grind gives the even and consistent red/white speckled sausage. The coarse grind gives a more irregular pattern, but keeps a more significant chew in the texture.

At every turn, I tried to keep the sausage traditional. Down to the fibrous casings. I typically prefer natural casings, but traditionally those casings are shunned for the synthetic casings.

With a short period for fermentation, there is a pleasant souring of the summer sausage. Once the casings have been soaked, stuffed, and set out to ferment, they dry overnight and then spend a little time over smoke. To maximize smoke time, I started the sausages over cold smoke. Cold smoking is not necessary, but if you take care to keep temps low in the beginning, the amount of smoke the sausages get before their temps reach 150 degrees is much higher.

After the sausages were dropped into a sink of ice and water to stop the cooking process, I chilled them. The next day, I sliced up the smaller sausage (the sausage I am keeping as a fabrication tax). The first thing I noticed was the texture was as I had hoped. There was no mushiness which can happen in the finely ground Wisconsin venison summer sausage.

The meaty and moderately gamey venison flavors were the most prevalent flavor with sweet smokiness. I smoked the sausages over chestnut hulls and corn cobs (mostly because I was cleaning out the freezer and they were there). The smoke coming from the corn cobs smelled amazing and I will save my summer cobs to smoke next fall. As I have noted in the past, I appreciate the gamier flavors of wild venison and really wanted to let those flavors come through.

The spices added subtle flavors, but these sausages were decidedly simple and I was happy for it. The contextless venison boudin from last week came with no measuring stick. A venison summer sausage comes with expectations and this sausage meets those and it is a relief more than anything.

Venison Summer Sausage 36 ounces venison, ground with large die 12 ounces pork back fat, ground with large die 1/4 cup ramp kraut juice 23 grams kosher salt 30 grams nonfat dry milk powder 20 grams dextrose 1/2 tsp ground ginger 2 cloves garlic, grated 1 tablespoon chili flake 4 grams pink salt 3 grams black pepper, crushed 3 grams coriander seed, crushed 1 grams fennel seed, crushed 6 grams mustard seed, crushed

Step one: Combine all of the ingredients above in a cold mixing bowl and stir with a paddle attachment until a meatball-sized piece of meat sticks to your hand as it is suspended.

Step two: Stuff into fibrous casings which have been soaked in hot tap water for 30 minutes. Tie tightly and prick casings to remove air bubbles.

Step three: Hang in a warm room for 10-12 hours to ferment. Then store in the fridge until you smoke the sausages.

Step four: Start the sausage with cold smoke (as cold as possible) for 2 hours. Then increase heat until sausages reach 150 degrees internal temps. Shock in an ice bath.

Step five: Store in the fridge. Consume with cheese, crackers, and beer.


Venison Summer Sausage

In round two of turning venison scrap into something more edible, I made a dangerous choice. A sausage of great familiarity. Summer Sausage. It is easy to be without context when the only question is “Does it taste good?” I guess easy is relative, because it seems easy in comparison to when you are familiar and add “Does it taste right?” to “Does it taste good?” Venison summer sausage is, when combined with Ritz crackers and cheese, the most popular pre-dinner, post-lunch food in Wisconsin. When given venison scrap, how could i have ignored the opportunity to stock the pre-dinner, post-lunch larder for the year, or more likely, the remainder of April?

I based the recipe on an earlier beef summer sausage I made. I also opted to keep the grind very coarse. This is somewhat in conflict with standard summer sausage, but I like the texture of the sausage better with a coarse grind despite liking the appearance better with the finer grind.

A finer grind gives the even and consistent red/white speckled sausage. The coarse grind gives a more irregular pattern, but keeps a more significant chew in the texture.

With a short period for fermentation, there is a pleasant souring of the summer sausage. At every turn, I tried to keep the sausage traditional. Down to the fibrous casings. I typically prefer natural casings, but traditionally those casings are shunned for the synthetic casings.

Once the casings have been soaked, stuffed, and set out to ferment, they dry overnight and then spend a little time over smoke. To maximize smoke time, I started the sausages over cold smoke. This is not necessary, but if you take care to keep temps low in the beginning, the amount of smoke the sausages get before their temps reach 150 degrees is much higher.

After the sausages, were dropped into a sink of ice and water, I chilled them. The next day, I sliced up the smaller sausage. The first thing I noticed was the texture was as I had hoped. There was no mushiness which can happen in the Wisconsin venison summer sausage. The flavors were strongly venison with sweet smokiness. I smoked the sausages over chestnut hulls and corn cobs (mostly because I was cleaning out the freezer and they were there). The smoke coming from the corn cobs smelled amazing and I will save my summer cobs to smoke next fall.

The spices added subtle flavors, but these sausages were decidedly simple and I was happy for it. The contextless venison boudin from last week came with no measuring stick. A venison summer sausage comes with expectations and this sausage meets those and it is a relief more than anything.

Venison Summer Sausage 36 ounces venison, ground with large die 12 ounces pork back fat, ground with large die 1/4 cup ramp kraut juice 23 grams kosher salt 30 grams nonfat dry milk powder 20 grams dextrose 1/2 tsp ground ginger 2 cloves garlic, grated 1 tablespoon chili flake 4 grams pink salt 3 grams black pepper, crushed 3 grams coriander seed, crushed 1 grams fennel seed, crushed 6 grams mustard seed, crushed

Step one: Combine all of the ingredients above in a cold mixing bowl and stir with a paddle attachment until a meatball-sized piece of meat sticks to your hand as it is suspended.

Step two: Stuff into fibrous casings which have been soaked in hot tap water for 30 minutes. Tie tightly and prick casings to remove air bubbles.

Step three: Hang in a warm room for 10-12 hours to ferment. Then store in the fridge until you smoke the sausages.

Step four: Start the sausage with cold smoke (as cold as possible) for 2 hours. Then increase heat until sausages reach 150 degrees internal temps. Shock in an ice bath.

Step five: Store in the fridge. Consume with cheese, crackers, and beer.


Bacon Pic of the Day – Saving the Auto Industry…

It’s technological innovation like this that will help bring our domestic auto companies out of recession!

I want to see this at the 2011 North American International Auto Show!  Do you hear me Big Three???  Get on it!

Originally posted 2010-05-20 10:02:24.

Related Stories:November 23, 2013 Bacon Pic of the Day – I Ate What?February 22, 2014 Bacon Pic of the Day – Where Does Bacon Come From?

International Bacon Day!

Shame on us! We could give a lot of excuses as to why we have been so remiss in this year's preparation for IBD. (This Saturday the 5th) But really, there is no excuse, its bacon's big day! We could blame work and home life and the fact that Darren is a quitter. But no! We are bad and should be punished (as long as said punishment is not a withholding of bacon, that's just cruel, whats the number for Amnesty International?).

That being said, I do intend to have a small celebration, 3 meals, all with bacon, and maybe some snacking bacon in between. I wonder if this kid will be celebrating?

Bacon Boutique – Elemental Bacon…

Along the same lines as this shirt comes this nice looking tee from the folks at Tanga

You better act quick, this could sell out at any time especially since it’s 1) cool and B) just $7.99 (not including S&H).  Want it?  CLICK HERE.

Thanks to FoTDB Seth (SHOUT OUT!) who bought this to my attention this morning and to his friend Amy (SHOUT OUT) for telling him to go and buy it!

Originally posted 2010-05-14 09:13:27.

Related Stories:October 15, 2009 Bacon Boutique – Makin’ Bacon!August 31, 2013 Bacon Boutique – Lifestyle Choice…

2055. CAVATELLI, CABBAGE and BACON

serves 4-6


1 lb. package cavatelli
6 slices bacon, cut into ½" pieces
4 cups shredded cabbage
¾ cups onion, minced
¼ cup butter
½ teaspoon salt
¼ teaspoon pepper

Cook cavatelli according to package directions. Drain and keep warm. Meanwhile, in a large skillet, fry bacon over medium-high heat until almost browned; about 5 minutes. Add cabbage and onions. Cover and cook, stirring occassionally, for 10 mins or until tender. Remove cover, stir in butter, salt and pepper. Cook over high heat 3-5 mins. or until cabbage and onion are slightly browned. Toss with cavatelli. Serve immediately.


bacon recipe courtesy of: Sara "Sherry Gentile," Akron, Ohio, for TasteBook

Pork Belly BLT

short-order-pork-belly-blt

Short Order’s Pork Belly BLT

The “B” in this BLT comes from the pork belly. Of course, you can always add bacon and make it a BBLT! This recipe comes to us from Chef Christian Page who serves innovative Americana cuisine at Short Order Restaurant, located at the Original Farmers Market in Los Angeles. Page, a Connecticut native whose background showcases his commitment to the farm-to-table approach, takes full advantage of the California bounty and embraces a “sloppy good” food philosophy, interpreting classic American fare with quality artisanal and locally sourced ingredients.

Christian’s food philosophy: “The care one puts into cultivating ingredients is as important as the care that one puts into preparing them. The knowledge required to thoughtfully prepare ingredients is as important as the knowledge required to holistically appreciate them. Having these elements in harmony is essential to the quality and enjoyment of the end product, and that’s how you make fully-traceable ‘taste good / feel good’ food.”

Short-Order_2013-01-18_11-27-27_IMG_6789_©RyanTanaka2012

Short Order’s Pork Belly BLT

Step 1: Make your brine

2 lbs. pork belly
2 qt. water
1/2 cup salt
1/4 cup sugar
2 tbsp. black pepper corn
1 tbsp. all-spice berries
2 inches fresh ginger (sliced)
3 bay leaves
1 zest of lemon
1 zest of lime
1 zest of orange plus juice
1 sprig of rosemary
3 each dried cayenne peppers

Add all the ingredients in a pot and dissolve sugar and salt. Cool down and submerge pork belly for 24 hours in refrigerator.

Step 2: Cook

After 24 hours, sear pork belly on both sides and bake for 3-4 hours at 240 degrees. Cool and slice 1/4 inch thick.

Step 3: Build Sandwich

Toast two pieces of sourdough bread. Spread mayo on one piece of the bread and add tomato jam (or tomato) on the other. Add your pork belly, bibb lettuce, tomato and avocado. If the pork belly is not enough you can add bacon to it. Enjoy!

The post Pork Belly BLT appeared first on Bacon Today.

Dad’s Love Bacon!

At least I know I do…and I know there are a few others out there as well.  Why not consider Archie McPhee when deciding on that Father’s Day gift for your special Dad in your life…

While we’ve featured the Bacon Collection before, it just seems appropriate to share this again (considering I just got my Archie McPhee email today with the subject line “Father’s Day Bacon”).

Twelve different bacony items for under $40?  You can’t be serious?

They are serious, and don’t call them Shirley.

Originally posted 2011-06-02 21:48:06.

Related Stories:May 19, 2013 The Bacon Collection…February 15, 2011 Archie McPhee Strikes Again – Bacon Toothpaste…

Skulls @ Target – Halloween 2010

Man, I have been trying to get this post up all week but I am in serious skull shopping overload and now completely broke. Went to my local Target on Sunday and picked up TONS of new stuff. The shelves were a little bare so I'm not sure if they were ransacked before I got there or if they were still putting stuff out. One things for sure, Target's halloween stuff is going quick. Quite a few of the items I wanted to post for you guys are already out of stock online.

This skull candy dish is my pick of the year from Target but it's only sold online. Fortunately, they have a great free shipping offer on a lot of the halloween items right now if you spend $50.00.

Boston Warehouse Bone Collector Footed Candy Dish - $19.99Boston Warehouse Bone Collector Earthenware Footed Candy Dish

Halloween Skeleton Piggy Bank - $9.99 Halloween Skeleton Piggy Bank

Multi Skull Melamine Dinner Plate (Set of 6) - $11.99

This is my 3rd skull cookie jar and they have another one in silver that's only sold online.
Earthenware Skull Cookie Jar - $19.99

This skull platter is online only too.
Skull Earthenware Serving Platter - $14.99

Ceramic Skull Salt and Pepper Shakers - $4.99

Skull Serving Tray - $4.99


Once I'm able to I'll post a pic of my skull windfall from Target. Some of the stuff I found, like the most awesome black on black skull tablecloth ever, aren't even on the website at all!

Better with Bacon – Roasted Potato & Bacon Salad

So simple, so mouth watering delicious…my kind of recipe! 

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Let’s get our cooking on, shall we?

Roasted Potato & Bacon Salad

Ingredients:

6 slices bacon, chopped 1-1/2 lb.  baby red potatoes, halved Sea salt + freshly ground pepper Handful flat-leaf parsley leaves (or to taste), chopped 2 pickles, diced 1 tbsp each: grainy mustard, mayonnaise 1 tsp red wine vinegar

Directions:

In large skillet, add bacon and splash water (to decrease chances of it burning as it releases its fat). Cook over medium-high, reducing heat if needed, until bacon is crisp. Transfer bacon to paper towels to drain. Strain fat; reserve 3 tablespoons. In roasting pan, toss potatoes and reserved bacon fat. Season well with salt and pepper. Roast in preheated 400F oven 40 minutes or until golden. Cool 5 to 15 minutes. Toss with bacon, parsley, pickles, mustard, mayonnaise and vinegar. Serve warm.

Makes 4 side servings.

[photo and recipe via Toronto Star]

Originally posted 2009-11-02 14:41:55.

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