serves 6-8

1 1/2 cups puffballs, halved or quartered if large
1 heaping cup lobster mushrooms, sliced (discard any brown-fleshed pieces)
1 tablespoons bacon fat
1 tablespoons butter
several pinches Herbes de Provence
7 medium eggs (5-6 jumbo)
1/2 cup whole milk
1 cup cheddar cheese, grated
6 strips maple bacon, cooked until firm and roughly chopped
1/2 onion, diced
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper
1/4 teaspoon Herbes de Provence

Preheat oven to 375 F. In a frying pan on low medium heat, sauté puffballs and lobster mushrooms with bacon fat, butter, salt, and several pinches Herbes de Provence. Cook until mushrooms are soft throughout, and begin to turn a caramel golden brown, at least ten minutes. Set aside. Heat an oiled cast iron skillet (9-10?) over low medium heat. Add additional butter, bacon fat, or olive oil to coat the pan if needed. In a large bowl, whisk eggs and milk, two minutes. And the reserved mushrooms. Add cheese, bacon, onion, salt, pepper and Herbes de Provence, and mix well. Pour mixture into cast iron skillet when it is heated, and cook for 5-7 minutes. Occasionally run a spatula across the bottom of the pan in a figure-8 motion, to prevent the egg mixture from sticking, and to more quickly distribute heat. When mixture starts to bubble through to the top (about the same time that a turn of the spatula reveals a large chunk of cooked egg), transfer pan to the oven. Bake for 12-16 minutes more, until frittata is cooked through. Remove from oven, and allow to cool slightly before serving.

bacon recipe courtesy of: Emma, of agates and madeleines, September 24, 2012

Originally posted 2013-09-17 01:49:00. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

Why Does Science Hate Bacon?

Why does science always try to take away everything we love? Any time people start enjoying their life by eating a Bacon Cheese Burger, doing recreational drugs, or burning old car tires in my back yard just to see how much smoke I can make, science comes along and throws some kind of study in my face telling us to stop doing everything fun.

I found a bunch of news websites reporting that a new study is showing eating bacon will increase your chances at getting pancreatic cancer by 19%. Now whether or not this is true is not the reason I’m upset about this issue. The thing that is really ticking me off it the way it’s being reported.

First off, every website is calling this a new study. Well I seem to remember reading this exact same thing a couple months ago. In fact it’s like every 5 or 6 months a “new study” comes out telling us that bacon is going to give us cancer. Either news outlets just rehash this story on slow news days or a lot of money is being wasted doing the same study over and over again.

We get it, Bacon is less healthy then broccoli so why don’t you scientists turn your attention to something meaningful like creating a car that gets 100mpg or figuring out why Jimmy Fallon is still on television?

Another thing that really gets me going is every one of these reports puts bacon in their headline and go on and on about how eating two rashers of bacon a day will kill you. But really the study showed that eating just under 2 ounces if any processed meat will increase your cancer risk. The study it’s self doesn’t single out bacon therefore trying to destroy an entire food industry it just says processed meats but I didn’t see any headlines that read, “Death Deli” or “Stop Putting Sausage in Your Mouth!”

This attack on bacon is very miss leading. Realistically what processed meat is eaten the most? I would make the claim that lunch meat is the most consumed processed meat. Sure people enjoy some bacon with breakfast but in today’s fast paced world most people only get time to cook bacon on the weekends but lunch meat might get consumed everyday. It’s quick and easy to throw sliced turkey on bread and head out the door lunch in hand. That is the entire point of lunch meat; they even put the word lunch in the name. I know people that eat lunch meat sandwiches every day for lunch and although they don’t claim it’s healthy eating they might not realize the risk.

By using bacon in their headlines to grab people’s attention then just barley mentioning that it’s really all processed meats these reporters are keeping people in the dark about the dangers of their roast beef hoagie.

Does this mean you should stop eating all processed meats ,move to an eco friendly farm, and start calling yourself Starchild Moonface? Of coarse not. Once again it all comes down just common sense. Instead of swinging by McDonalds every morning and pounding down McGriddles try some fruit or yogurt every once and a while. It’s really that simple.

Originally posted 2012-02-13 10:28:07. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

Flavour Pair: Bacon and Caramelized Onions

Every once in a while I become obsessed with a particular combination of flavours. There was a whole week last year where almost everything I ate contained some combination of peanut butter and banana. More recently, I went on a roasted red pepper and goat cheese kick, finding every possible way to combine these flavours, […]

Originally posted 2012-10-22 15:16:38. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

Record Breaking Bacon Cheeseburger

My love of cheeseburgers is well-known and documented. I am of the mind that the bacon cheeseburger may be the finest example of North American cuisine in history, and never pass up the opportunity to try a new one. When a new burger place opens up in my town, I am sure to be in […]

Originally posted 2012-09-06 20:43:35. Republished by Blog Post Promoter


1 1/2 lb pork tenderloin
4 strips thick cut bacon
1 Fuyu persimmon, cut cross-wise into thin disks
10 dried arbol chiles
2 cloves garlic, thinly sliced
ground ginger
ground cumin
olive oil

3 tablespoons apple cider vinegar
1/2 small onion, diced
1/2 Fuyu persimmon, peeled & chopped small
1 cup chicken broth
ground ginger
cayenne pepper
olive oil
1 tablespoon butter

Tenderloin Preparation: Preheat oven to 350°F. Clean tenderloin and pat dry with paper towels. Sprinkle generously with salt & pepper. Sprinkle lightly with ginger and cumin. Drizzle olive oil in baking dish large enough for tenderloin (9 x 13). Lay bacon strips crosswise in dish. On top of bacon lay persimmon slices, then arbol chiles and garlic slices. Lay tenderloin on one side of dish and roll across, wrapping bacon around persimmons, chiles and garlic. Tuck ends of bacon under tenderloin. Roast in oven until thermometer reads 160°F in thickest part of tenderloin (about 30 minutes). Remove tenderloin from oven, take out of baking dish, and let rest 10 minutes on clean dish while making sauce.

Sauce Preparation: Pour vinegar into baking dish, swirl, and let sit. Meanwhile heat a Tbs. of olive oil and butter over medium heat in a sauce pan. Add onion and saute 3 minutes. Swirl vinegar in baking dish again and pour into sauce pan with onions. Simmer 3 minutes. Add persimmon and pinches of ginger and cayenne and simmer another 2 minutes. Add chicken broth and simmer until persimmon is very soft and sauce is reduced and thickened (about 5 minutes). Slice tenderloin through bacon into 1/4 inch slices. Arrange medallions on plate and pour sauce over generously.

bacon recipe courtesy of: Wine of the Month Club/Gold Medal Wine Club, 5330 Debbie Road, Suite 200, Santa Barbara, California 93111

Originally posted 2013-05-25 01:16:00. Republished by Blog Post Promoter


Thank you to The Meat Hook in Brooklyn for this genius concoction. It shall grace the plate of my Hanukkah dinner tonight. Happy Holidays to you all!



Originally posted 2009-12-11 19:36:00. Republished by Blog Post Promoter


serves 4-6

3 tablespoons olive oil
3 slice bacon, chopped
4 lbs. oxtails, cut into 3-inch segments
2 carrots, chopped
1 stalk celery, chopped
1 onion, chopped
2 cloves garlic, chopped
1 can (14 oz.) diced tomatoes, with juice
4 cups beef stock
1 cup dry white wine
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon dried marjoram
1/2 teaspoon five-spice powder (optional)
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
2 cups water
1 cup pearl barley
1/4 cup minced fresh flat-leaf (Italian) parsley
croutons (recommended: garlic croutons)

In a large pot, heat oil over medium heat. Add bacon and saute until browned and crispy, about 5 minutes. Remove with a slotted spoon to a plate lined with paper towels. Set aside. Increase heat to medium-high and add half the oxtails, cut ends down, to the pot; let cook, undisturbed, until browned, about 8 minutes. Turn to brown the other end, then brown the sides. Remove with a slotted spoon to a warm plate. Repeat with remaining oxtails. Reduce heat to medium and add carrots, celery and onion to the pot; saute until softened, 3 to 4 minutes. Return the oxtails and any accumulated juices to the pot and add garlic, tomatoes with juice, stock, wine, salt, marjoram, five-spice powder (if using) and pepper; bring to a boil. Cover, reduce heat to low and simmer gently until meat is falling off the bones, about 2 hours. Meanwhile, in a saucepan, bring water to a boil over medium heat. Add barley and a pinch of salt; cover, reduce heat to low and simmer until tender, about 20 minutes. Remove oxtails from the pot with a slotted spoon and let cool slightly, then pick the meat from the bones. Discard bones. Skim the fat from the surface of the soup with a large spoon. Return meat to the pot and add reserved bacon; reheat, if necessary. Taste and adjust seasoning with salt and pepper, if necessary. Divide barley among heated bowls and top with soup. Garnish with parsley and croutons.

bacon recipe courtesy of: 300 Sensational Soups by Carla Snyder and Meredith Deeds, 2008, pp. 166-167

Originally posted 2012-11-21 14:10:00. Republished by Blog Post Promoter