Keep Fit – Eat Meat Every Day

This past weekend I ventured over the Williamsburg bridge for brunch at Marlow & Sons. My friend and I shared a couple dishes that included an amazing boudin sausage—possibly my favorite part of the meal (and yes, I did have bacon). Afterwards we stopped into Marlow & Daughters to check out the butcher shop where this wonderful sausage came from. Scott Bridi, manager and charcutier (and dining partner), was kind enough to give us a tour. See all photos here.
The place was packed and meat case close to empty. Scott was busy cranking out lamb sausages. Eventually there was a lull & the meat case was replenished before the shot above was taken. I was then introduced to the various charcuterie available—smoked meats, fresh sausages, patés, terrines. There is a lot of thought and care in the preparation of these items. Wine and fresh herbs are often used “to create the balance of a well composed dish,” according to Bridi. We of course had to see for ourselves… we sampled duck rillettes, pork rillettes, a Sunset Park taco-inspired pig head terrine, and sweet sopressata. Like the boudin at brunch, I could certainly eat any of these as a meal by itself. Another wonderful thing about the prepared foods is that it gives the shop an opportunity to make use of the whole animal.
Marlow & Daughters does whole animal butchering and they source their animals very locally. Their beef is from 3 farms in upstate NY. Pork comes from EcoFriendly Foods in VA as well as farms upstate including Flying Pigs. The lamb is from Elysian Fields Farm in PA. Duck and rabbit are from a farm in New Paltz. Meat isn’t all that they get locally. Fresh veggies come from Guy Jones’ upstate farm and their beans come from Cayuga Pure Organics in Ithaca. A number of groceries are sourced even closer to home: popsicles from Brooklyn Flea regulars People’s Pops, Williamsburg’s own Mast Brothers Chocolate, and Marlow & Sons’ house-made ice cream, granola, marmalade and hazelnut butter (to name a few).
This is truly your local neighborhood butcher shop… and if it’s not exactly local to you, it’s worth it to go out of your way. These guys aren’t just chopping up meat. They can tell you what cut to use and the best way to prepare it. There is a flexibility and a trust between the staff of M&D and their customers. Talk to Scott, TJ or Andrew who can offer suggestions on easy, delicious dishes based on what’s available. Coming from the kitchens of Gramercy Tavern, craft, and Momofuku—these guys know how to fucking cook. So take advantage of that knowledge when planning your next meal. And don’t forget:
P.S.M&D will soon be selling barbecue packages… Get your grills ready! (Talking to you, Rosa.) If you can’t grill, their eponymous pork sausage will be available at Summer Stage this year.

Originally posted 2010-04-27 11:22:00. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

Hot Bacon Beverages

As much as it pains me to say it, the time of iced coffees and cold everything is sadly over. There’s something about a latte when its on ice that makes me forget I’m drinking enough caffeine to make my heart feel like it’s going to explode, which somehow makes me feel less guilty. That […]

Originally posted 2012-09-26 12:00:32. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

Barbacoa

DSC06873

Every year around the fourth of July, we head North for a good bit of time and every year I bring a prize cut of meat along with. This year I brought a huge cow’s head hoping to make barbacoa the old way, in a pit. Once I got there, I dug a big pit, lined it with stones and started a huge fire in the hole. After the fire was down to embers, I lowered a chile-slathered, banana-leaf wrapped cow’s head into the hole and pushed a load of dirt around it. Eighteen hours later, I unearthed it and it was merely warm. I tried to cook it in on a grill then in an oven. In the end, I was not convinced the head was safe to eat, so I scrapped it.

That failure has stuck in my craw since then, so on basically the first weekend I had free since the fourth, I reserved another cow’s head and stopped with the pit-roasting fantasy and got back to a cooking device where I am more comfortable – my smoker.

DSC06528

On Friday night, I started with six different dried chilis, rehydrated them, and pureed them with cumin and salt. Then I slathered the head with this chili mixture and wrapped the enormous head in banana leaves. Adding the banana leaves has two purposes. First, by wrapping the head in these leaves, the head is essential steam-smoked. Second, the banana leaves add an earthy, almost grassy, flavor.

DSC06849

DSC06850

After getting the smoker lit, I removed the top grate and stood the head on an angle and shoved the lid in place. The head was so big it barely fit in a smoker that fits 5 hams in it. After smoking the head for a few minutes shy of 24 hours, I rested it for another 2 hours and then removed the banana leaves.

DSC06859

The appearance of the head had changed dramatically and I was not prepared for how easy it was to pull the meat from the skull. Both cheeks were pulled from the bone by hand and came off in single pieces. The remaining meat was found primary under the jawbone and next to the eye sockets. This sounds paltry, but it was nearly four pounds of spicy, smokey meat ended up in the fridge and an enormous skull hitting the freezer for stock.

DSC06864

We took half of a cheek immediately for tacos. Staying simple with pickled smoked red onions, cilantro and lime, the tacos were fantastic. The beef had a nice bark, but was still far more tender than I typically like in beefy situations. The chili flavors were there in their spicy and deep raisiny goodness, but were matched by the beefy, smoke flavor and a touch of the banana leaf flavor. This was not the ho-hum Chipotle barbacoa, but a far more complex, far beefier version of it.

After such a failure as was the pit roasting experiment, I was quite happy with the results. Given the dramatic look of the giant cow’s head, there is value in trying this from a barbecue perspective. However that same feature is a good reason not to try this. It is unwieldy. If you have the space to try this, you may never look at that Chipotle burrito the same way.

How to Make Bacon Turtles

I’ve been waiting for the right time to tell you about these guys. It’s not that I felt you haven’t been ready. Okay, maybe I have. But it’s just that these are so nut-tacular (it’s a word – look it up), that I haven’t felt completely happy telling an unprepared Republic of Bacon fanbase about […]

Five Strange Baconized Forms of Transportation

Yah, yah, I know: we don’t normally think about bacon when we think of ways of getting around. But bacon has been attached to almost every conceivable thing, so it’s no surprise that the Internet (and let’s face it, real life, too) has conspired to turn many of our forms of transportation into bacon-related forms […]

The Best of the Rest of the Instructables Bacon Challenge

As you might have remembered, the Instructables website recently issued a challenge to produce something for their website that featured bacon. The winning entry was bacon caviar – which was truly spectacular. But there were so many great entries, I think we should cover a few more today. So here, from bacon guitars to bacon […]

Keep Fit – Eat Meat Every Day

This past weekend I ventured over the Williamsburg bridge for brunch at Marlow & Sons. My friend and I shared a couple dishes that included an amazing boudin sausage—possibly my favorite part of the meal (and yes, I did have bacon). Afterwards we stopped into Marlow & Daughters to check out the butcher shop where this wonderful sausage came from. Scott Bridi, manager and charcutier (and dining partner), was kind enough to give us a tour. See all photos here.
The place was packed and meat case close to empty. Scott was busy cranking out lamb sausages. Eventually there was a lull & the meat case was replenished before the shot above was taken. I was then introduced to the various charcuterie available—smoked meats, fresh sausages, patés, terrines. There is a lot of thought and care in the preparation of these items. Wine and fresh herbs are often used “to create the balance of a well composed dish,” according to Bridi. We of course had to see for ourselves… we sampled duck rillettes, pork rillettes, a Sunset Park taco-inspired pig head terrine, and sweet sopressata. Like the boudin at brunch, I could certainly eat any of these as a meal by itself. Another wonderful thing about the prepared foods is that it gives the shop an opportunity to make use of the whole animal.
Marlow & Daughters does whole animal butchering and they source their animals very locally. Their beef is from 3 farms in upstate NY. Pork comes from EcoFriendly Foods in VA as well as farms upstate including Flying Pigs. The lamb is from Elysian Fields Farm in PA. Duck and rabbit are from a farm in New Paltz. Meat isn’t all that they get locally. Fresh veggies come from Guy Jones’ upstate farm and their beans come from Cayuga Pure Organics in Ithaca. A number of groceries are sourced even closer to home: popsicles from Brooklyn Flea regulars People’s Pops, Williamsburg’s own Mast Brothers Chocolate, and Marlow & Sons’ house-made ice cream, granola, marmalade and hazelnut butter (to name a few).
This is truly your local neighborhood butcher shop… and if it’s not exactly local to you, it’s worth it to go out of your way. These guys aren’t just chopping up meat. They can tell you what cut to use and the best way to prepare it. There is a flexibility and a trust between the staff of M&D and their customers. Talk to Scott, TJ or Andrew who can offer suggestions on easy, delicious dishes based on what’s available. Coming from the kitchens of Gramercy Tavern, craft, and Momofuku—these guys know how to fucking cook. So take advantage of that knowledge when planning your next meal. And don’t forget:
P.S.M&D will soon be selling barbecue packages… Get your grills ready! (Talking to you, Rosa.) If you can’t grill, their eponymous pork sausage will be available at Summer Stage this year.