Making Parmigiano-Reggiano

This NYT’s cartoon story explains the making of what is without a doubt the most versatile and delicious of all aged Italian cheeses — Parmigiano-Reggiano, or Parmesan, as we know it here in America.

No good kitchen should ever be without it for dressing up soups, salads, and casseroles. 

Here’s the link followed by my ideas for using this King of The Cheeses.

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2014/06/06/opinion/food-chains-code-name-parmigiano.html

Top Ten Uses for Parmigiano-Reggiano 

Never serve a bowl of pasta without some grated on the side for diners to help themselves. 

Grate over steamed or sauteed asparagus. 

Whisk grated cheese into an omelet. 

Grate over a bowl of minestrone.

Add the rind to soup as it’s simmered to lend a pleasant creamy-saltiness to the broth.

Serve a chunk on a cheese platter with a soft cheese, olives, crackers, sliced pears or grapes, roasted peppers, etc. 

Grate into Chicken Caesar Salad. 

Toss into creamy chicken casseroles to boost flavor.

Shave thin slices over salad tossed with orange sections and toasted walnuts. 

Add grated cheese to seasoned breadcrumbs, then coat thin pieces of chicken or fish before baking.  

Originally posted 2014-06-09 14:44:28. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

My very favorite food writer, Sam Sifton, explains how to make the perfect hamburger. His direction…

My very favorite food writer, Sam Sifton, explains how to make the perfect hamburger. His direction comes just in time for the burger-grilling season, and he even mentions one of my favorite secret tips for a better burger — add a little raw, chopped bacon to the meat patty. I know it sounds wacky, but it works and is especially good for making turkey burgers, which lack moisture because turkey meat is so lean. 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/06/25/dining/how-to-make-a-great-burger.html?hp&action=click&pgtype=Homepage&version=HpSectionSumSmallMedia&module=pocket-region&region=pocket-region&WT.nav=pocket-region

Originally posted 2014-06-23 19:35:34. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

Tastes Like Chicken, But it’s …

The real food market continues to be nibbled away at by fake, processed foods that taste like chicken, beef, and bacon. This is sad and some think necessary. Read on …

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/04/03/business/meat-alternatives-on-the-plate-and-in-the-portfolio.html?hp

Originally posted 2014-04-03 05:07:09. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

If You Want it Gluten Free, It’s Out There!

Thank goodness I’m not gluten intolerant. I could never give up eating a croissant, a piece of naan, real French bread, a New York bagel. You get the point. To be gluten-free or not to be? That’s the big question in this day and age of fad-food diet choices. 

Don’t you just love how certain food manufacturer’s are now marketing their products with labels like, “Gluten-Free.” Take bacon. For some reason that information now printed on just about every bacon package appears to sell more of this wonderful popular food. But there’s never been gluten in bacon, which leads me to believe people don’t really understand what gluten is. 

This New York Times article reports on how chefs are cashing in on the gluten-free trend and our confusion regarding it. 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/06/18/dining/gluten-free-eating-appears-to-be-here-to-stay.html?hp

Dr. Bacon – “Epilepsy’s Big, Fat Miracle”…

This one goes out to FoTDB Seth (SHOUT OUT)…

Stephen Lewis for The New York Times; Food Stylist: Brett Kurzweil

He posted this on the Facespace two weeks ago and specifically called me out on it.  It’s a terrific article about the use of food as medicine.  The author, Fred Vogelstein, relates his experience with his epileptic son and how a change to a high fat diet has help reduce his seizures, here’s just a quick excerpt…

Evelyn, Sam’s twin sister Beatrice and I don’t eat this way. But Sam has epilepsy, and the food he eats is controlling most of his seizures (he used to have as many as 130 a day). The diet, which drastically reduces the amount of carbohydrates he takes in, tricks his body into a starvation state in which it burns fat, and not carbs, for fuel. Remarkably, and for reasons that are still unclear, this process — called ketosis — has an antiepileptic effect. He has been eating this way for almost two years.

Read it, it’s truly fascinating…

Photo and article via New York Times.

Originally posted 2010-12-03 21:26:01.

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Green Giant Tells Consumers to Eat Brownies with Spinach

Classify this idea under “Things that make you go hmmm.”

Green Giant is selling pureed vegetable pouches, believing consumers will mix pureed spinach into brownies and pureed squash into mac and cheese in order to increase their daily servings of vegetables.  Read about it here. 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/04/30/dining/stealth-vegetables.html?hp