Bacon Pic of the Day…The Tastiest Part

This is a family show, so I had to “edit” accordingly, but I think you’ll get it just fine…

Like it, own it!  Print of original ink drawing. Print measures approximately 5?7 inches. Printed on archival velvet fine art stock using archival pigment ink.  $10.00 + $2.50 s/h.

via Etsy

Originally posted 2010-10-14 21:33:01.

Related Stories:March 30, 2013 — The Mona Bacon!December 24, 2012 — Bacon Anatomy of Perfection…


Originally posted 2013-12-27 03:22:13. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

Bacon Shortage? What Bacon Shortage?

Some good news from the USDA last week…

The U.S. Department of Agriculture reported last week that through the end of October, frozen pork supplies were down 4 percent from the previous month but up 24 percent from last year. Stocks of pork bellies were up 22 percent from last month and up 119 percent from last year.

So this holiday…make mine bacon!

Thanks to CTBites for the bacon pron.

Related Stories:October 11, 2012 — Prepare for Bacongeddon…Ron Swanson Style!October 2, 2012 — Bacon Pic of the Day – Bacon Shortage?
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Originally posted 2012-11-27 02:01:10. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

Bacon Shortage? What Bacon Shortage?

Some good news from the USDA last week…

The U.S. Department of Agriculture reported last week that through the end of October, frozen pork supplies were down 4 percent from the previous month but up 24 percent from last year. Stocks of pork bellies were up 22 percent from last month and up 119 percent from last year.

So this holiday…make mine bacon!

Thanks to CTBites for the bacon pron.

Related Stories:October 11, 2012 — Prepare for Bacongeddon…Ron Swanson Style!October 2, 2012 — Bacon Pic of the Day – Bacon Shortage?
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Originally posted 2012-11-27 02:01:10. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

2881. AGAVE and BOURBON SMOKED BACON

2 ounces kosher salt (about 1/4 cup)
1 teaspoon pink curing salt
1/4 cup coconut palm sugar
1/4 cup raw agave nectar
1 5 to 6 pound pork belly
4 cups bourbon whiskey

Curing directions: If necessary, defrost your pork belly in the refrigerator. You cannot cure frozen pork! Combine the salt, pink salt and sugar in a bowl and mix well. Rub this mixture over the entire surface of the belly. Place pork belly in a 2 gallon Ziploc bag or shallow container. (The salt will make the pork release water creating a brine). Pour the agave nectar over the pork belly. Make sure it’s distributed evenly on all sides of the pork belly. Refrigerate, turning the pork, and redistributing the cure every day for seven days. Remove the pork from the cure, rinse thoroughly, and pat dry. Place it on a rack set over paper towels in the refrigerator and allow to dry, uncovered for 12-24 hours.

Smoking your pork: Set your smoker to 200 degrees. I used maple wood pellets for smoking. Hickory, apple, or pecan would work, too. Fill your water dish with four cups of your favorite bourbon or whiskey. Place your pork belly in your smoker and cook it until the pork reaches an internal temperature of 150 degrees, about 3 hours. Remove from smoker and let cool slightly when it’s cool enough to touch. If your pork belly has skin on it, cut it off leaving as much fat as possible. Allow to cool, then wrap in plastic wrap and refrigerate or freeze until ready to slice and use.

bacon recipe courtesy of: Anne-Marie Nichols, This Mama Cooks!, August 9, 2011

2603. BACON PORK ROLLS with LYCHEE SAUCE

600 grams pork belly
10 pieces of bacon
1/2 teaspoon pepper
3 sprigs thyme
salt to taste
1/2 teaspoon cumin
lemon juice from one lemon
1 tablespoon brown sugar

Sauce:
3 tablespoons tomato sauce
5 fresh lychee fruits, seeds removed
salt to taste
a dash of pepper
1/2 teaspoon sugar
a little water

Marinade the pork belly with pepper, thyme, salt, cumin, lemon juice and brown sugar. Wrap the bacon over the pork belly and tie with strings. Heat up oven to 120 degrees C and slow roast for 2 hours. To make the sauce, add some water in pan, add lychee and put in the tomato sauce. Add salt, pepper and sugar. Bring to a boil. You can use corn flour mixed with a little water to thicken the sauce.

bacon recipe courtesy of: PeteFormation Foodie Adventure, September 29, 2009

2250. RAMEN of BACON, BEEF and CHICKEN DASHI, PORK BELLY SOUS VIDE and PICKLED SHIITAKE MUSHROOMS

serves roughly ten

For the dashi:
2 pounds beef neck bones
2 pounds pork neck bones
2 large pieces of Kombu
1 pound chicken backs or bones
1 pound chicken feet
2 pig trotters
1 pound smoky bacon, the smokiest you can get
2 ounces dried shiitake mushrooms
2 onions, diced
2 carrots, peeled and diced
1 bunch scallions, sliced
2 star anise
1/2 cup cane vinegar, or to taste
1/2 cup soy sauce, or to taste

Heat oven to 400°. Put beef and pork neck bones on sheet pan and roast in oven for 30 minutes. Flip bones and roast for an additional 15-30 minutes, until bones are deeply roasted.

While bones are roasting, put kombu in large stock pot and cover with 20 cups of cold water. Bring to a boil, then remove from heat. Let steep for 10 minutes. Remove kombu and discard or save for another use.

Put raw chicken backs or bones, chicken feet, pig trotters and bacon into the kombu water and return to the stove over medium heat.

When the beef and pork bones are done roasting, pour off any melted fat and save for another use. Add roasted bones to the water. Put roasting pan over a high flame and pour a cup or so of water into the pan to deglaze it. Scrape the pan with a spoon or spatula to remove any flavorful bits that are stuck to the bottom of the pan. Pour all of this goodness into the stockpot with the bones. Be sure bones are submerged. If more water is required to submerge bones, add whatever it takes.

Bring stock just to a simmer, and allow to simmer slowly (a bubble or two every couple of seconds) overnight, occasionally skimming any scum that forms on top. Naturally, water will evaporate from the pot, so take note of the liquid’s starting level and replenish every hour or so as necessary.

Add mushrooms, onions, carrots, scallions and star anise. Simmer for one more hour.

Remove from heat and let fully cool under refrigeration or, if it is winter in Chicago, on a porch/stoop/fire escape. When cooled, the stock will be separated into solid fat at the top and gelatin beneath the fat. Scrape solidified fat from the top of the stock and discard, or save for another use, then reheat the stock until it is liquid again. Strain the stock through the finest strainer available. Reserve mushrooms for the pickled shiitake mushrooms and discard everything else.

Taste stock and add cane vinegar and soy sauce. Stir stock completely and taste again. Adjust flavor using additional amounts of these two seasoning agents. This broth should last about seven days.

For the pork belly:
2 pounds boneless pork belly, skin off
2 stalks celery, thinly sliced
3 cloves garlic, peeled and smashed
1 star anise
Salt and pepper to taste

Place all ingredients in plastic bag designed to be vacuum sealed, evenly spacing ingredients. Vacuum seal bag, then place in an immersion circulator set around 142 degrees and cook for 12 hours. Let pork belly cool, then place in a pan, still in the bag. Cover with another pan, then weigh this pan down with heavy cans and refrigerate overnight. The idea is to compress the pork belly into a compact “block”. After pressing, remove belly from its bag. When ready to serve, sear pork belly on a hot cast iron pan over medium high heat, 3 minutes per side. Let cool slightly, then cut into thin slices.

For the pickled shiitake mushrooms:
Reserved shiitake mushrooms from dashi, sliced thin
1/4 cup dashi
1/2 cup cane vinegar
1/4 cup soy sauce
1 tablespoon sambal (chile paste)
1 tablespoon freshly grated ginger

Bring all ingredients but the mushrooms to a boil. Pour over mushrooms and let cool. Cover and keep refrigerated. This’ll keep for about a week.

To assemble dish:
Good quality packaged or homemade ramen noodles
pork, beef and chicken dashi
pork belly sous vide
pickled shiitake mushrooms
scallions, sliced
radish Sprouts
nori

Simmer noodles until cooked, then rinse in a bowl of very hot water. Drain, then place in a bowl. Add a few slices of pork belly and a few pickled shiitake mushrooms, arranging in an attractive manner. Sprinkle scallions and radish sprouts in bowl. Place a piece of nori in the bowl. Present to your guests. At the table, ladle hot dashi into each bowl. Serve with chopsticks.

bacon recipe courtesy of: Hugh Amano, Soup and Bread, Chicago, Illinois, April 5, 2011