The Bacon Tornado

the-bacon-tornado
Looking for a recipe for Super Bowl Sunday? Consider the Bacon Tornado, a close relation to the ever-popular Bacon Explosion. Paul Sidoriak’s Bacon Tornado is a whirlwind of bacony flavor that picks up porky goodness in its path. Thinly-pounded pork tenderloin gets rolled around a stuffing of bacon, Pepper Jack cheese, and sautéed onions. The pillow of pork is wrapped tightly in bacon and slowly roasted with smoke on the Big Green Egg until the bacon is crispy. After about 25 minutes, you should notice a line of hungry football fans forming. These make an excellent main course, or as appetizers when sliced. Be sure to make several if you’ve got a hungry crowd!

Paul Sidoriak is a longtime foodie who will try to cook just about anything outside, and on the grill. His website GrillingMontana.com showcases some of his culinary successes and failures, often from the grill. If he is not cooking on the Big Green Egg, you can probably find him fly-fishing near his home in Western Montana. He would be honored if you would follow him on Facebook and on Twitter @GrillingMontana.

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1 8-ounce pork tenderloin medallion pounded to 1/4-inch thickness
1 teaspoon smoked paprika
1 teaspoon garlic powder
1 teaspoon onion powder
1 teaspoon black pepper
7 slices bacon
1/4 cup sweet onion
1/4 cup pepper jack cheese grated

1. Mix the four dry spices, and season both sides of flattened medallion. Dice three slices of bacon, cook in a nonstick skillet, remove, and let cool. DO NOT BURN. Reserve 2 tablespoons of bacon grease to sauté onions over low heat until translucent, and then allow to cool. Mix onions, bacon and Pepper Jack cheese in a bowl.

2. Lay remaining four slices of bacon side-by-side on a clean surface. Lay the pork medallion flat on top of the bacon strips. Smear the bacon-onion-cheese mixture down the center of the cutlet. Roll the cutlet and outer bacon strips tightly over the mixture. As you roll, the bacon strips come along to wrap the Tornado, leaving nothing but bacon exposed.

3. Roast on your grill over indirect heat at 375 degrees F for 45 to 60 minutes until bacon looks irresistible and internal temperature of pork is at least 155 degrees F. For greater flavor, use applewood chips. Let Tornado rest 10 minutes under loose foil tent. Slice and enjoy.

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The post The Bacon Tornado appeared first on Bacon Today.

Originally posted 2014-01-31 01:21:46. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

Keep Fit – Eat Meat Every Day

This past weekend I ventured over the Williamsburg bridge for brunch at Marlow & Sons. My friend and I shared a couple dishes that included an amazing boudin sausage—possibly my favorite part of the meal (and yes, I did have bacon). Afterwards we stopped into Marlow & Daughters to check out the butcher shop where this wonderful sausage came from. Scott Bridi, manager and charcutier (and dining partner), was kind enough to give us a tour. See all photos here.
The place was packed and meat case close to empty. Scott was busy cranking out lamb sausages. Eventually there was a lull & the meat case was replenished before the shot above was taken. I was then introduced to the various charcuterie available—smoked meats, fresh sausages, patés, terrines. There is a lot of thought and care in the preparation of these items. Wine and fresh herbs are often used “to create the balance of a well composed dish,” according to Bridi. We of course had to see for ourselves… we sampled duck rillettes, pork rillettes, a Sunset Park taco-inspired pig head terrine, and sweet sopressata. Like the boudin at brunch, I could certainly eat any of these as a meal by itself. Another wonderful thing about the prepared foods is that it gives the shop an opportunity to make use of the whole animal.
Marlow & Daughters does whole animal butchering and they source their animals very locally. Their beef is from 3 farms in upstate NY. Pork comes from EcoFriendly Foods in VA as well as farms upstate including Flying Pigs. The lamb is from Elysian Fields Farm in PA. Duck and rabbit are from a farm in New Paltz. Meat isn’t all that they get locally. Fresh veggies come from Guy Jones’ upstate farm and their beans come from Cayuga Pure Organics in Ithaca. A number of groceries are sourced even closer to home: popsicles from Brooklyn Flea regulars People’s Pops, Williamsburg’s own Mast Brothers Chocolate, and Marlow & Sons’ house-made ice cream, granola, marmalade and hazelnut butter (to name a few).
This is truly your local neighborhood butcher shop… and if it’s not exactly local to you, it’s worth it to go out of your way. These guys aren’t just chopping up meat. They can tell you what cut to use and the best way to prepare it. There is a flexibility and a trust between the staff of M&D and their customers. Talk to Scott, TJ or Andrew who can offer suggestions on easy, delicious dishes based on what’s available. Coming from the kitchens of Gramercy Tavern, craft, and Momofuku—these guys know how to fucking cook. So take advantage of that knowledge when planning your next meal. And don’t forget:
P.S.M&D will soon be selling barbecue packages… Get your grills ready! (Talking to you, Rosa.) If you can’t grill, their eponymous pork sausage will be available at Summer Stage this year.

Originally posted 2010-04-27 11:22:00. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

Apple Bacon Pork Roast? I’m ready for this!

Slow Cooker Apple Bacon Pork RoastThis recipe for Slow Cooker Apple Bacon Pork Roast is a slow cooker recipe for roast pork that’s both simple to make and packed with flavor. Sliced apples, apple juice, and brown sugar give this roast a sweet and autumn-like flavor.

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Originally posted 2013-10-18 02:37:29. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

2850. BACON-WRAPPED PORK LOIN with CHERRIES

serves six?

1 2-pound piece boneless pork loin?
1/2 teaspoon ground allspice
black pepper
1/2 cup dried cherries, chopped?
1/2 cup fresh flat-leaf parsley, chopped?
1 tablespoon whole-grain mustard?
6 slices bacon?
1 tablespoon currant jelly?
1 teaspoon red wine vinegar

Heat oven to 350°?F. Season the pork with the allspice and 1?2 teaspoon pepper and place on a rimmed baking sheet. In a small bowl, combine the cherries, parsley, and mustard. Spread evenly over the pork.?Lay the bacon slices crosswise over the pork, overlapping them slightly and tucking the ends underneath. Roast for 45 minutes. In a small bowl, combine the jelly and vinegar. Brush over the bacon and continue roasting until an instant-read thermometer registers 150°; F, 10 to 15 minutes more. Let rest at least 10 minutes before slicing.

bacon recipe courtesy of: Kate Merker, Real Simple, March 2009

Originally posted 2013-02-26 01:28:00. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

Feijoada

We host a dinner party periodically which is actually just a book club to which my wife belongs. Typically those types of groups are simply drinking clubs, but this one adds food and actual books. About a week before book club, I realized my original plan of serving cassoulet had been done before. By me. Last winter. It seems as when the weather grows cold, I cook beans – large pots of beans with sausages and off cuts.

Actually I should have never been surprised. Beans and meats are fantastic and this weather has forced my hand. Only, I am not a repeater. Knowing fabada is a not-so-distant cousin to cassoulet, I figured there must be more cousins. I just needed to look.

Then I remembered a Brazilian dish, feijoada, which is very similar to cassoulet only made with black beans and features carne seca (which in its place I used beef jerky). I felt like I had struck gold until I searched for recipes. I looked in Alex Atala’s new book. Nothing. In fact, Atala’s goal is to push past the iconic feijoada and churrasca of Brazil.  I looked online. There were tons of recipes and none developed any consensus with the others, so I did what I thought was reasonable. I made an approximation of cassoulet using the building blocks of feijoada adding some ingredients which might be a tad more Brazilian.

One thing I remember being difficult about fabada was losing bits of the pork tails, bones included, in the dish. If I am the only one eating, I can work around the bones, but if I am serving others, I like to keep their teeth intact, so along with the larger pieces of jerky, I wrapped the pork tails in cheesecloth. Once they cooked long enough, I removed the cheesecloth, chopped the tails and beef jerky and added them back. Before adding them back, I thickened the liquid by mashing a cup of the cooked beans and added them back to the mix.

Next, I wanted to have some flavors from the sugar cane liquor from Brazil, Cachaça, so I cooked the onions and garlic, added them to the beans, then deglazed the pan with the liquor and spooned the aromatically fortified liquor the beans. To me, this was a fun touch.

When finished the feijoada was strongly meaty, as anticipated, and was both smokey from the tails and linguiça and prominently beefy from the jerky. The beans retained their texture and, while most photos showed the liquid strained off, I really liked the bean juice. It was thick and carried hints of sweetness from the orange and cachaça. I wish I could have found a little farofa to add as a garnish, but the bright green garnishes of cilantro and green onion would have to suffice.

There are differences between cassoulet and feijoada that I did not anticipate. First, apparently feijoada is served with rice. Second, this batch  felt lighter than most cassoulet. There are no scoops of lard here, but you still get the clean meat flavors. I like the richness of cassoulet, but I really love the way the feijoada doesn’t kill the rest of the day. Now is a good time to stock up on ideas for meat and beans and I am all ears.

Feijoada

1 1/2 pounds smoked pig tails or necks
1 1/2 pounds Linguiça
1/2 pound real beef jerky, not shrink wrapped is a good start
1 pound dried black beans
1 quart ham stock
3 bay leaves
1 serrano chili
1/2 orange
Water
2 onions, sliced
1 head garlic, minced
1 tablespoon lard
2 tablespoons Cachaça
Salt and pepper, to taste
1 bunch cilantro, chopped
6 green onion, sliced

Step one: In a glass or earthenware dish, cover black beans with water by 4″ and soak overnight. Drain.

Step two: Tie jerky and smoked pork tails in cheese cloth and add to a large stock pot with beans, ham stock and enough water to cover by 2″.

Step three: Bring to a boil, then reduce to a simmer, and cook for 3-4 hours.

Step four: Remove bag of meat. Chop and remove bones.  Remove 1 cup of beans, mash into a paste. Add back to beans.

Step five: Sweat onions and garlic. Add to beans/meat with bay leaves. Deglaze onion/garlic pan with Cachaça and add to beans.

Step six: Add sausages, orange, serrano chilis. Simmer for an additional hour.

Step sever: Remove bay leaves, orange, and seranno chili. Salt to taste and eat in a bowl with rice (if you want, I skipped), green onions and cilantro.

Originally posted 2014-02-13 00:20:34. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

NYC’s Best Sandwiches

Grubstreet has a list of the 101 Best Sandwiches in New York. And no surprise, many of these are pork sandwiches! There are so many in fact that I decided to choose a mere 10 from the list that I would like to try in the next year or so. From the bottom of the list up, here are my picks:
100. The Elvis – Peanut Butter & Co.
83. Ham & Cheese – Char No. 4
56. Bacon & Marmalade – Prune
53. PMB (pancetta, mango & basil) – Sullivan St. Bakery
43. Bacon, Egg & Lettuce – BKLYN Larder
39. Bacon, Egg & Cheese – Prime Meats
32. BLT – Frankie’s Sputino
26. Country Ham Biscuit – Egg
22. Grilled 3-Cheese with House-smoked Ham – The Breslin
13. Croque Monsieur – Bar Boulud
I think I’ll start with number 53! A lot of these picks are based on me already loving particular restaurants or wanting to try ones I haven’t. There is lots of porky goodness on the list besides these. What are your favorites? Any sandwiches that you think are missing? I think Bierkraft’s Serrano should have been very high on the list. And are ice cream sandwiches not considered? Because Xie Xie’s 1000 Year Old Ice Cream Sandwich would easily top my list!

Originally posted 2010-06-01 07:57:00. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

Venison Summer Sausage

In round two of turning venison scrap from my father into something more edible, I made a dangerous choice – a sausage of great familiarity. Summer Sausage. It is easy to cook without context when the only question is “Does it taste good?” I guess easy is relative, because it seems easy in comparison to when you are cooking something familiar and add “Does it taste right?” to “Does it taste good?” Venison summer sausage is, when combined with Ritz crackers and cheese, the most popular pre-dinner, post-lunch food in Wisconsin. When given venison scrap, how could i have ignored the opportunity to stock the pre-dinner, post-lunch larder for the year, or more likely, the remainder of April?

I based the recipe on an earlier beef summer sausage I made. I also opted to keep the grind very coarse. This is somewhat in conflict with standard summer sausage, but I like the texture of the sausage better with a coarse grind despite liking the appearance better with the finer grind.

A finer grind gives the even and consistent red/white speckled sausage. The coarse grind gives a more irregular pattern, but keeps a more significant chew in the texture.

At every turn, I tried to keep the sausage traditional. Down to the fibrous casings. I typically prefer natural casings, but traditionally those casings are shunned for the synthetic casings.

With a short period for fermentation, there is a pleasant souring of the summer sausage. Once the casings have been soaked, stuffed, and set out to ferment, they dry overnight and then spend a little time over smoke. To maximize smoke time, I started the sausages over cold smoke. Cold smoking is not necessary, but if you take care to keep temps low in the beginning, the amount of smoke the sausages get before their temps reach 150 degrees is much higher.

After the sausages were dropped into a sink of ice and water to stop the cooking process, I chilled them. The next day, I sliced up the smaller sausage (the sausage I am keeping as a fabrication tax). The first thing I noticed was the texture was as I had hoped. There was no mushiness which can happen in the finely ground Wisconsin venison summer sausage.

The meaty and moderately gamey venison flavors were the most prevalent flavor with sweet smokiness. I smoked the sausages over chestnut hulls and corn cobs (mostly because I was cleaning out the freezer and they were there). The smoke coming from the corn cobs smelled amazing and I will save my summer cobs to smoke next fall. As I have noted in the past, I appreciate the gamier flavors of wild venison and really wanted to let those flavors come through.

The spices added subtle flavors, but these sausages were decidedly simple and I was happy for it. The contextless venison boudin from last week came with no measuring stick. A venison summer sausage comes with expectations and this sausage meets those and it is a relief more than anything.

Venison Summer Sausage

36 ounces venison, ground with large die
12 ounces pork back fat, ground with large die
1/4 cup ramp kraut juice
23 grams kosher salt
30 grams nonfat dry milk powder
20 grams dextrose
1/2 tsp ground ginger
2 cloves garlic, grated
1 tablespoon chili flake
4 grams pink salt
3 grams black pepper, crushed
3 grams coriander seed, crushed
1 grams fennel seed, crushed
6 grams mustard seed, crushed

Step one: Combine all of the ingredients above in a cold mixing bowl and stir with a paddle attachment until a meatball-sized piece of meat sticks to your hand as it is suspended.

Step two: Stuff into fibrous casings which have been soaked in hot tap water for 30 minutes. Tie tightly and prick casings to remove air bubbles.

Step three: Hang in a warm room for 10-12 hours to ferment. Then store in the fridge until you smoke the sausages.

Step four: Start the sausage with cold smoke (as cold as possible) for 2 hours. Then increase heat until sausages reach 150 degrees internal temps. Shock in an ice bath.

Step five: Store in the fridge. Consume with cheese, crackers, and beer.

Originally posted 2014-04-10 23:21:42. Republished by Blog Post Promoter