2994. SWORDFISH with OLIVE-RAISIN TAPENADE with BROCCOLINI and BACON

yields four servings

1 cup olives, chopped
½ cup raisins, plumped in hot water
½ cup tomatoes, small diced
2 tablespoons garlic, minced
2 tablespoons fresh basil, chiffonade
2 tablespoons fresh mint, chiffonade
4 oz olive oil
2 oz balsamic vinegar
¼ cup pine nuts, toasted
salt and pepper, to taste

Broccolini:
2 bunches broccolini, cleaned
1 tablespoon garlic, minced
2 oz olive oil
salt and pepper, to taste

Eggplant Puree:
3 eggplants, whole
1 lemon, juiced
3 oz olive oil
2 tablespoons fresh basil, finely chopped
1 tablespoon fresh mint, finely chopped
salt and pepper, to taste

Swordfish:
4 (6 oz) swordfish fillets?
olive oil, to coat
salt and pepper, to taste

For the Olive and Raisin Tapenade: Toss together ingredients and season to taste.

For the Broccolini: Blanch broccolini in salted water, shock in ice bath, and drain off excess water. Heat sauté pan with olive oil and slightly brown garlic. Add broccolini and heat through. Season with salt and pepper.

For the Eggplant Puree: Char eggplant over open grill until soft. Peel skin off eggplant and put in food processor. Add lemon juice, olive oil, salt, and pepper. Blend until smooth. Mix in bowl with basil and mint.

For the Swordfish: Season swordfish with olive oil, salt, and pepper. Sear until golden on both sides. Let rest.

To Plate: Place broccolini on plate. Make a line of eggplant puree. Lay swordfish across both. Top with tapenade.

bacon recipe courtesy of: Tiffany Derry, Top Chef, Season 7, Episode 7?

Originally posted 2013-07-20 01:05:00. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

2467. ROASTED SWORDFISH with HERBS, SMOKED BACON and RED WINE BUTTER

serves 4-6

3 pounds evenly cut swordfish
1/2 pound smoked slab bacon, cut into matchstick-size pieces
1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil
1 1/2 cups chopped, mixed fresh herbs (thyme, basil, chervil, tarragon)
peanut oil
sea salt and cracked black pepper
5 garlic cloves, finely minced

Sauce
4 shallots, peeled and chopped tablespoon extra virgin olive oil
3/4 cup red wine vinegar
1 teaspoon cracked black pepper
bay leaf
1 cup red wine
1/2 cup heavy cream
1 pound butter, cut into small pieces and kept cold

Have the fishmonger cut an even-sized section of boneless, skinless swordfish. Naturally, it must be spanking fresh. Divide it in half.

Cook the smoked bacon in its own fat until medium-rare. Remove the bacon from the fat. (The fat may be reserved for another use.)

With a larding needle or knife, insert the bacon pieces into the swordfish, spacing evenly over the two sections of fish. (This is the same procedure often used with game meats, such as venison.) Now, rub olive oil over the swordfish and rub about 1/3 of the herbs on the fish.

Bring a large, heavy skillet to a moderately hot temperature, add the peanut oil to the pan, and sear the fish well on all sides. Remove the fish from the heat and allow it to rest.

Heat the oven to 400 degrees. Season the fish with a little sea salt and freshly cracked black pepper. Then top the entire length of the fish with the remaining herbs and the minced fresh garlic. Put the fish in a small roasting pan and place it in the oven. Roast for 20 to 25 minutes.

While the fish is roasting, make the sauce: In a medium-sized saucepan, gently stew the chopped shallots in the olive oil. Add the red wine vinegar, black pepper, and bay leaf and reduce to 3 tablespoons. Add the red wine and reduce to 1/4 cup. Add the heavy cream and reduce the entire mixture till it thickens.

Beat in the butter, bit by bit, until it is all incorporated, and then strain the sauce through a fine-mesh strainer and keep warm.

Remove swordfish from the oven and allow to rest in a warm place for 5 to 10 minutes.

Slice the swordfish into portions. If the fish is too rare in the center for your taste, just lay it out in the pan and warm it in the oven for a few more minutes.

Ladle a few ounces of the warm butter sauce onto each plate and top with the fish. Serve.

bacon recipe courtesy of: Feast of Sunlight by Norman Van Aken. Harvard Common Press, 1997

Originally posted 2012-02-09 09:08:00. Republished by Blog Post Promoter